About Aquaponics

Aquaponics is a system for farming fish and plants together in a mutually beneficial cycle.

Fish produce wastes that turn into nitrates and ammonia. These aren’t good for the fish if they build up too much, but they’re great fertilizer for plants. As the plants suck up these nutrients, they purify the water, which is good for the fish.

Fish are kept in large tanks and the plants are grown hydroponically; that is, without soil. They are planted in beds with a little gravel or clay and their roots hang down into the water. The water is cycled through the system, so that it collects the “waste” from the fish; then it’s pumped to the plant beds, where it is filtered naturally by the plants and can then be returned to the fish tanks.

Aquaponics is an environmentally friendly and efficient way to produce food. Unlike traditional farming methods, no chemical fertilizers are needed for the plants: they all come from the fish-waste. It also tends to be organic, because the use of pesticides would be damaging to the fish. Once the system is set up, only a little extra water is needed to make up for evaporation, because the same water is constantly recycled. This is a great improvement on traditional plant-growing, which consumes a lot of water.

Adapted from How Stuff Works

aquaponics_system

Source: designaffects.com